Tuesday, September 30, 2008

This study shares the results of an effort to understand the needs and goals of future institutional repository (IR) users at the University of Colorado at Boulder (UCB). Due to underutilization of IRs at other institutions, the University Libraries at UCB decided it was imperative that insight into users' goals and needs of an IR be gained before design of the repository began. The libraries partnered with faculty and students with expertise in human-computer interaction to study user needs. The results of this study yielded "personas" describing different classes of potential IR users on university campuses, which can be used to guide IR architects in designing repositories that facilitate increased participation.

This insight began with interviews conducted with eight graduate students and twelve faculty members from several disciplines. As described by Miaskiewicz, et al the interview transcripts were then clustered into four unique groups using a new approach based on Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA). The needs of each of the user groups were then represented through a persona, a method used in the human-computer interaction (HCI) field for summarizing and...

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Tuesday, September 30, 2008

To teach incoming undergraduate students information literacy skills, a research team at the University of Michigan School of Information developed the Defense of Hidgeon, a web-based board game. We opted for a game in lieu of other approaches because what people are doing when they are playing good games is good learning. This article describes the game's backstory, how to navigate its 34-space game board, and special game-play features. The research team invited a class of undergraduate students to play the game, gave monetary awards to winning teams, and interviewed students about their game-play experiences to determine what they learned and obtain their suggestions for improvements to the game. The authors offer three premises for the redesign of the Defense of Hidgeon and discuss these premises with regard to the design of future information literacy games.

Go to source: http://www.dlib.org/dlib/september08/markey/09markey.html

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Jenny Brace

The Version Identification Framework (VIF) Project ran between July 2007 and May 2008 and was funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee, (JISC) under the Repositories and Preservation Programme in order to help develop versioning best practice in repositories.

The project was run by partners, the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) the University of Leeds] and Erasmus University Rotterdam. It has produced a Detailed Web-based framework, which provides information and guidance about versioning in repositories. The article, ‘Version Identification: A Growing Problem’ published in Ariadne Issue 54 explored the issues associated with versions in institutional repositories and outlined the current research and work carried out to date. This successor article highlights some of the best practice developed within the VIF Project, which is also available in more detail in the framework itself. It also accompanies the event report in Ariadne Issue 55, ‘Which One’s Which? Understanding Versioning in Repositories’ which reported on VIF’s final workshop in April 2008.

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