Friday, August 29, 2008

How does a protein fold? What happens to space-time when two black holes collide? What impact does species gene flow have on an ecological community? What are the key factors that drive climate change? Did one of the trillions of collisions at the Large Hadron Collider produce a Higgs boson, the dark matter particle or a black hole? Can we create an individualized model of each human being for personalized healthcare delivery? How does major technological change affect human behavior and structure complex social relationships?

What answers will we find – to questions we have yet to ask – in the very large datasets that are being produced by telescopes, sensor networks, and other experimental facilities?

These questions – and many others – are only now coming within our ability to answer because of advances in computing and related information technology. Once used by a handful of elite researchers in a few research communities on select problems, advanced computing has become essential to future progress across the frontier of science and engineering. Coupled with continuing improvements in microprocessor speeds, converging advances in networking,...

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Friday, August 29, 2008

It’s one thing to say you support open-access publishing. It’s another to provide authors with a pot of money to actually pay for it.

That’s what’s happening at the University of California Berkeley. In January, the university launched the Berkeley Research Impact Initiative, a pilot program co-sponsored by the University Librarian and the Vice Chancellor for Research to cover publication charges for open-access journals.

Go to Source:
http://www.arl.org/sparc/publications/articles/memberprofile-berkeley.shtml

Thursday, July 31, 2008

The European Commission today adopted two initiatives in the area of copyright. First, the Commission proposes to align the copyright term for performers with that applicable to authors, in this way bridging the income gap that performers face toward the end of their lives. Secondly, the Commission proposes to fully harmonise the copyright term that applies to co-written musical compositions. In parallel, the Commission also adopted a Green Paper on Copyright in the Knowledge Economy. The consultation document focuses on topics that appear relevant for the development of a modern economy, driven by the rapid dissemination of knowledge and information. Both of these initiatives comprise a unique mix of social, economic and cultural measures aimed at maintaining Europe as a prime location for cultural creators in the entertainment and knowledge sectors.

Go to Source: http://europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP/08/1156&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=fr

Thursday, July 31, 2008

By Tom Storey

One of the fastest growing trends today is combining data and functionality from several sources to create new services that provide a unique user experience. They’re called mash ups. Think Google Maps. Yahoo Pipes. Facebook Plug-Ins. Libraries are doing Web mash ups as well: Meebo Instant Messaging. Library Lookup. Bookburro. And, in a way, they’ve been doing all kinds of mash ups for years. Think story hour, open-shelf access, cafes, book lockers.

As a changing social and economic landscape raised concerns about childhood literacy and children’s recreational reading, Caroline Hewins initiated a read-aloud, storytelling activity at the Hartford Public Library. She mixed children and families and books and stories from the rapidly expanding body of children’s literature. The result was a useful and fun new library program.

As new social and economic trends changed information discovery behaviors, Dave Pattern introduced a way to bring readers from a popular book site to the library. He mixed the library collection with the bookstore experience to reach a growing new audience with a creative new library service. The result was traffic for the...

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Thursday, July 31, 2008

By Belinda Weaver

The University of Queensland (UQ) maintains an online research profiling system, UQ Researchers,to showcase the expertise of its academic staff and postgraduate students. The site makes available detailed research profiles and evidence of expertise at various levels. It incorporates school, institute and centre research profiles, CV-type profiles for individual researchers, research project and publication details, and details of available research facilities. External users can search for topical areas and seek opportunities for research collaboration. The service is often used internationally by aspiring research higher degree students who are seeking to identify institutions or individual academics with research strength in their chosen area of study. The UQ Researchers site provides access not only to the expertise and experience of individual researchers but also to that of research groups across the University. Participation in the service is currently optional. There is no mandate for inclusion.

UQ Researchers offers direct data entry, as well as a data sourcing system that automatically collects information about academics and...

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