Friday, November 9, 2007

By Andrew Treloar, David Groenewegen, Cathrine Harboe-Ree

This article describes the work currently underway at Monash University to rethink the role of repositories in supporting data management. It first describes the context within which the work has taken place and some of the local factors that have contributed to the inception and continuation of this work. It then introduces the idea of a Data Curation Continuum and describes the various continua that might be applicable in a repository data management context. The article then discusses some of the implications of this approach, before reviewing related work.

Go to source:
http://www.dlib.org/dlib/september07/treloar/09treloar.html

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

The Conference Proceedings from this interesting and challenging conference are now available.

Go to Source:
http://lib.kth.se/iatul2007/

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

In September 2006, the Libraries embarked upon a series of studies of University of Minnesota scientists and graduate students in the sciences in order to understand and incorporate their unique information needs into projects underway in the Libraries and to develop new services and tools where needed. Through focus groups and interviews with over 70 deans, faculty members, and graduate students representing departments on the Twin Cities' campuses, from the Institute of Technology (a college that includes physical science departments and engineering), the College of Biological Sciences, the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences and the Academic Health Center (which includes six health sciences schools and colleges and the University of Minnesota Duleth department of Pharmacy), the study concluded in May 2007.


Go to Source:
http://www.lib.umn.edu/about/scieval/

Tuesday, October 9, 2007

David W. Lewis

Dean of the IUPUI University Library

The wide application of digital technologies to scholarly communications has disrupted the model of academic library service that has been in place for the past century. Given the new Internet tools and the explosive growth of digital content available on the Web, it is now not entirely clear what an academic library should be. This article is an attempt to provide a strategy for academic libraries in what is left of the first quarter of the 21st century. There are five components of the model: 1.) Complete the migration from print to electronic collections; 2.) Retire legacy print collections; 3.) Redevelop library space; 4.) Reposition library and information tools, resources, and expertise; and 5.) Migrate the focus of collections from purchasing materials to curating content.

Go to Source:
https://idea.iupui.edu:8443/dspace/handle/1805/953

 

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