Friday, May 4, 2007

In this report on the State of America’s Libraries in 2006, the American Library Association found that: 

Public, school and university libraries are flourishing, both in traditional ways and in the still-exploding universe of the Internet.

Library use is up nationwide among all types of library users, continuing a decade-long trend.

Almost 1.8 billion visitors checked out more than 2 billion items last year at everything from one-room rural outposts to spectacular facilities such as Seattle’s new Central Library, which attracts thousands of patrons - and tourists - daily. Also of note:

● Investment in e-books at academic and research libraries rose an astonishing 68 percent from 2002 to 2004, the most recent year for which federal data are available

● Public libraries remain on the forefront in delivering new programmes to their customers while still providing the “nuts-and-bolts” services that people need to lead full lives - for example, the tools to conduct a job search, write a résumé or learn new work skills. Even with the rapid growth of all of these services, people are going to...

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Friday, May 4, 2007

Researchers’ Use of Academic Libraries and their Services: A report commissioned by the Research Information Network and the Consortium of Research Libraries Academic libraries have for centuries played critically-important roles in supporting research in all subjects and disciplines within their host universities and colleges. But the last decade has brought a sea-change in relationships between researchers and libraries. Technological developments and the availability of information resources online have changed how research is done, and also the services that academic libraries provide to their research communities. Both researchers and librarians have welcomed the benefits these changes have brought, adapting rapidly to them and seeking to exploit their potential to the full. And they both look forward to further change in the coming years.

With new technological developments and innovations come new challenges and new expectations. In commissioning this study, the RIN and CURL have sought to establish a solid base of evidence on how libraries have been developing their services and strategies, and how researchers have been making use of those services. But we have...

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Friday, May 4, 2007

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