Monday, October 31, 2016

Almost all of Europe’s academic research libraries are working collaboratively, within and outside of their institutions, to help ensure that the scientific data of today is curated properly, so it can be accessed, shared and reused by future generations. That is one conclusion from a recent survey on Research Data Services (RDS), carried out by a group of internationally renowned researchers in collaboration with LIBER’s Scholarly Communication & Research Infrastructures Committeeand DataONE.

The survey — which reflects answers from a representative sample of research libraries in 22 countries across Europe — also revealed that:

  •  Libraries are currently offering more consultative-type RDS services (eg. how to find information on Data Management Plans, metadata standards, or data citation practices) than technological services (eg. own storage solutions)...
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Monday, October 31, 2016

The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit was initially launched in 2005 by the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee (formerly the Scholarly Communication Committee) to support advocacy efforts designed to transform the scholarly communication landscape.

The toolkit is an educational resource primarily directed to librarians to assist them with:

1.       integrating a scholarly communication perspective into library operations and programs and

2.       preparing presentations on scholarly communication issues for administrators, faculty, staff, students, or other librarians.

The Toolkit includes short overview essays on key scholarly communication issues...

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Monday, October 31, 2016

You’re the leader. You have a vision. It will require real organizational change. Now what? Empathic leaders may do better at gaining followers than encouraging resistors.

In their excitement for a new idea or fundamental shift in direction, leaders expect others will naturally want to follow and offer their support. Yet even when leaders share a passionate vision and a concrete roadmap leading the way, often it is either too little to build support or concern at the prospect of change outweighs optimism for a better library future. Every library leader will at some point confront resistance to change. In leadership sessions and conference hallway conversations, I will hear from leaders, new ones in particular, perplexed by their inability to engage staff or team members in a productive change process. They wonder if it is something they are doing wrong or simply a case of staff digging in their heels to maintain the status quo—or quite possibly both.

...

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Friday, September 30, 2016

Grinnell College is combining learning analytics with human-intelligence networks to increase student retention and completion. Various social and psychological factors play a role in student success, and these can be linked to learning data to paint a fuller picture of each student's likelihood of success. The college is working to understand the "science" of interventions and to provide faculty and staff with information on the effectiveness of those interventions.

 

http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/9/blending-human-intelligence-and-analytics-for-student-success

Friday, September 30, 2016

Earlier this week my Ithaka S+R colleagues and I published “Student Data in the Digital Era: An Overview of Current Practices,”in which we review how institutions of higher education are currently using student data, and some of the practical and ethical challenges they face in doing so. As we conducted research for this report, part of ourResponsible Use of Student Data in Higher Education project with Stanford University, we heard recurring concerns about the growing role of for-profit vendors in learning analytics. These third-party vendors, the argument goes, operate without the ethical obligations to students that institutions have, and design their products at a remove from the spaces where learning

 

http://www.sr.ithaka.org/blog/...

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Friday, September 30, 2016

Academic librarians, seeing changes in teaching and learning at their institutions, seek to understand these changes and ensure that their spaces, services, and resources respond accordingly. They ask what is different about the work habits and library needs of students in “flipped” and other kinds of active learning classes. By gathering information on new teaching and learning patterns and practices, they will be better equipped to highlight relevant services, develop new ones that address emerging needs, and provide spaces within the library configured to support their students’ work

 

http://www.sr.ithaka.org/blog/making-space-in-the-library-for-new-pedagogies/

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