Monday, July 4, 2016


This report documents the Strategic Thinking and Design work that the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) engaged in from the fall of 2013 through the end of 2015. Fuelled by the deep desire of the ARL membership to rise to the challenges facing higher education in the 21st century, and with grants from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Association engaged in an unprecedented project to reimagine the future of the research library and then reshape ARL, its organization, to help bring that future into being.

 

This process was unprecedented in that, instead of trying to ameliorate, one by one, the challenges that research libraries face—challenges that are a product of the friction between the research libraries’ historical evolution and a rapidly changing context—or seek a silver-bullet technological solution to move the community forward, the process focused on what the research library would be if it were specifically designed for the context of the 21st century—for the digital and networked age....

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Monday, July 4, 2016


Looking at the vast ocean that is modern-day computing, we can see that major developments come in waves. The arrival of mainframe computers in the 1960s generated the first wave (one computer for many people), followed in the late 1970s by personal computers in the second wave (one computer for one person). In 1988, Mark Weiser presciently observed that computers embedded into everyday objects, objects all around us, were forming the third wave—what he called ubiquitous computing (many computers for one person). A decade later, in 1999, Keven Ashton put forth the ideas behind, and coined the term for, the fourth wave: the Internet of Things.

In this paradigm shift, Weiser's computer-embedded everyday objects—or "things"—are connected to the Internet and can communicate with users and with other devices. The guiding principle is connection, along with the conviction that if something can be connected, it will be connected. Indeed, in recent years, the wave appears to be rising to a crest. The...

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Monday, July 4, 2016


As academic libraries evolve to meet the changing needs of their surrounding communities, we are beginning to engage with these communities in new ways, such as participating in efforts to transform teaching and learning. These shifts in services and roles can be challenging. As we try to figure out how to adapt and move forward, we need to apply new approaches to the way we think and problem solve. Enter the processes of design thinking and rapid prototyping.

 

http://crln.acrl.org/content/77/6/283.full.pdf+html

Monday, July 4, 2016


Every other year, the ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee produces a document on top trends in higher education as they relate to academic librarianship.

 

The 2016 Top Trends report discusses research data services, digital scholarship, collection assessment trends, content provider mergers, evidence of learning, new directions with the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy, altmetrics, emerging staff positions, and open educational resources.

 

http://crln.acrl.org/content/77/6/274.full.pdf+html

Monday, May 23, 2016

The web, we all thought, was going to transform academic publishing. At the very least, it would make research far more accessible, lowering the cost and expanding the reach of publications. At most, it would fundamentally alter the nature of research itself, making it far more collaborative. In either case, though, academic publishing as we knew it was doomed.

http://chronicle.com/article/Academic-Publishing-Toward-a/236526

 

Monday, May 23, 2016

Many interrelationships exist between research articles, data, software, and other resources used to produce scientific findings. A number of challenges, however, impede efforts to implement, standardize, and institutionalize cross-links between scholarly resources. This report outlines findings from a workshop titled "Data & Publication Linking" held January 5, 2016 in Washington, D.C., funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation's (NSF) Open Access & Open Data initiative, and the NSF's EarthCube initiative. The workshop convened a discussion on the challenges and opportunities for cross-linking data and publication repositories. It brought together nineteen researchers and stakeholders from a range of sectors including data repositories, scholarly publishers, academic libraries, and scholarly research service providers. In this report, we present a diversity of perspectives and initiatives that can inform community-based solutions to scholarly resource cross-linking challenges.

http://www.dlib.org/dlib/may16...

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