News Archive

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

 SPARC has released a new community resource for research funders entitled, “Implementing an Open Data Policy”. This primer addresses key issues that these organizations encounter when considering the adoption and implementation of an open data policy. The guide covers big-picture topics such as how to decide on the range of activities an open data policy should cover. It also delves into areas of very specific concern, such as options for where data can be deposited, and how privacy and other concerns can be managed.

SPARC has worked with funding organizations with increasing frequency on a number of fronts recently, as interest in open access and open data has continued to grow. The genesis of this interest is twofold. First, many funders invest in research in order to speed the pace of scientific discovery, encourage innovation, enrich education, and to enhance the public good. These funders recognize that one way to attain these goals is to make their research outputs - and their supporting data - available as quickly and as openly as possible. Second, both open access and open data offer very real practical benefits for these organizations. Many of these research...

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Wednesday, March 27, 2013

JISC’s Ben Showers sends a message from the future explaining library systems in 2020 and offers advice on improving the student experience. 

Increasingly, the distinction between services provided by libraries and the technologies of companies like Microsoft, Amazon and Google, are blurring or disappearing entirely. For users there is no distinction. The expectations of students using library services are measured against the services they receive from these corporate providers. For libraries (and the wider university or college) to meet and exceed expectations, the library needs to learn from and use the tools and techniques so effectively employed by these companies.

Go to source: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform/inform36/LibrariesOfTheFuture.html

 

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Exciting new trends for education sees the tech of tomorrow being used today.

Bett 2013 in London and the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, offered lots of opportunities for JISC’s future-watchers to spot the ‘next big things’ for education. JISC’s programme director Matthew Dovey and JISC RSC’s e-learning advisor Judy Bloxham found that this was also the year when some recent technologies found themselves with practical applications.

Go to source: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform/inform36/SpottingEmergingTechnologies.html

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Over the past several months, the proliferation of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) has been hailed as a potent defence against the rising cost and insular culture of attending a traditional college. The courses, which are generally taught by experts with affiliations to elite universities, are characterized by their unique pedagogy and unlimited enrolment. To date, no course has been accepted for transfer credit at a major on-campus institution; however some administrators and higher-education experts predict their gradual integration into university curriculum. This article examines the MOOC phenomenon, identifying aspects that academic librarians should consider in the coming years, including how these courses interact with scholarly resources and library services. Methods for integrating library services in these courses are evaluated, with recommendations for the best course of action.

Go to source:http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march13/wright/03wright.html

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

The existence of a ubiquitous and cheap worldwide communications network that increasingly makes documents easily and freely available will require a transformation of academic library collecting practice. It will be driven by a number of specific developments including: the digitization of content; the development of print repositories; the development of e-readers and print-on-demand publishing; the growth of open access; challenges to establish academic publishing organizations; and the growth of new forms of scholarship based on openness and social productivity. If academic libraries are to be successful, they will need to: deconstruct legacy print collections; move from item-by-item book selection to purchase-on-demand and subscriptions; manage the transition to open access journals; focus on curating unique items; and develop new mechanisms for funding national infrastructure. 

Go to source: http://crl.acrl.org/content/74/2/159.abstract

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Research Councils UK (RCUK) has published the latest version of its revised Policy on Open Access, which comes in to effect on 1 April 2013. 

This latest version draws the policy and the guidance together into one document and aims to give researchers, research organisations as well as publishers further clarity on the implementation of the policy.

RCUK is keen to continue to engage with its stakeholders on the development of the guidance, so is inviting organisations to provide further input to this version where aspects may still not be clear. RCUK will then revise the guidance further to take into account these clarifications.

Go to source: http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/media/news/2013news/Pages/130305.aspx

Friday, March 8, 2013

The ten most widely read EDUCAUSE Review and EDUCAUSE Review Online articles from 2012 focused on current IT issues, online education, analytics, academic libraries, and more. Pretty much every one of these talks about analytics at some point.

Go to source: https://sites.google.com/a/umich.edu/learning-analytics-fellows/news/topeducausearticlesoftheyear

Friday, March 8, 2013
In this report, we present the results of Ithaka S+R’s study of the scholarly practices of academic chemists. This study, funded by Jisc, presents information meant to empower research support providers in their work with chemists. The report covers themes such as data management, research collaboration, library use, discovery, publication practices, and research funding.
The report describes the findings of our investigation into academic chemists’ research habits and research support needs. The digital availability of scholarly literature has transformed chemists’ research by creating an environment where they can easily search for journal articles and chemical information. However, they often feel overwhelmed by the amount of new research available, and they need better tools to remain aware of current research. Furthermore, despite their heavy use of technology for research, many academic chemists have been slow to adopt new models of sharing data and research results such as online repositories and...
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Friday, March 8, 2013
Key findings:
 
· The top challenges for archives and special collections in the UK and Ireland are outreach, born-digital materials and space
 
· Alignment of special collections with institutional missions and priorities is an ongoing challenge
 
· The special collections sector is undergoing a major culture shift that mandates significant retraining and careful examination of priorities
 
· Philanthropic support is limited, as are librarians' fundraising skills
 
· Use of all types of special collections material has increased across the board
 
· Users expect everything in libraries and archives to be digitized
 
...
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Friday, March 8, 2013
The Individual and Scholarly Networks was a two-part seminar organized by Research Trends and Elsevier Labs on January 22, 2013. Webcast live from Oxford, Amsterdam and New York, the presentations were recorded and are available here, along with links to slides and additional questions and answers. The seminar was led by Michael Taylor, Research Specialist at Elsevier Labs with additional contributions from Dr Henk Moed and Dr Gali Halevi of Research Trends.
Researchers are increasingly using social network type platforms to form relationships and ad-hoc research reading groups.
 
Part 1 - Building Networks focused on the ways in which these relationships are formed and maintained, and how they are changing the nature of scholarly relationships.
 
Part 2 - Evaluating Network Relationships explored the related areas of altmetrics, contributorship and the culture of reference. Altmetrics is one of the most explosive areas of interest in bibliometric analysis and is increasing in importance.
 
Go to source: http://www....
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Friday, March 8, 2013
The presentations from the annual Seminar held in Bangkok, Thailand are now available. The seminar, held in November 2012, was hosted by IATUL in cooperation with Thammasat University Libraries. Innovation and innovation management in ASEAN libraries and some international libraries was discussed.