News Archive

Friday, January 29, 2016

On December 8 and 9, 2015, representatives from several regions (Asia, Europe, and

North America) met in Berlin, Germany, to discuss a proposal to flip subscription-based journals to open access models. The initiative is being led by the Max Planck Society, the organizer and host of the invitation-only Berlin 12 Open Access Conference. The rationale for the initiative is based on an analysis undertaken by Max Planck Digital Library (MPDL), which found that a flip to open access would be possible at no financial risk, “maybe even at lower overall costs”1 to the system. More information about the analysis is available in the MPDL white paper, Disrupting the Subscription Journals’ Business Model for the Necessary Large-Scale Transformation to Open Access.

 

The objective of the conference was to build a consensus for an internationally coordinated effort to shift libraries’ journal budgets away from subscriptions and towards article processing costs (APCs). The meeting was attended by 96...

Read more
Friday, January 29, 2016

Key Takeaways

  • Libraries increasingly offer the technological capacity and staff expertise to support student publishing, but this activity tends to happen in isolation from other library activities.
  • Harnessing publishing as a pedagogical tool improves student learning outcomes through high-impact learning practices: extensive writing, teamwork, service learning, undergraduate research, and experiential learning.
  • Partnering with students to achieve their publishing ambitions clarifies the requirements that the next generation of digital scholars may have for library technology infrastructure designed for preservation and access.
  • The University of Michigan Library connects scholarly communication and instruction by focusing on publishing as pedagogy, as illustrated in three case studies.

Go to source:...

Read more
Friday, January 29, 2016

Jointly organised by LIBER, FOSTER and RLUK

Research data management (RDM) in libraries is a quickly evolving service area.

This year’s workshop run by the Steering Committee on Scholarly Communication and Research Infrastructures therefore targeted two core activity areas:

1. The translation of institutional data management policies into research support services.

2. The need to support researchers in the creation and review of data management plans.

 

Go to source: http://libereurope.eu/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LIBER2015_RDM_workshop_report_2015.pdf

Friday, January 29, 2016

This report, prepared for SPARC Europe, sketches the landscape of university-based not‐for-profit publishing in Europe with a primary focus on open access publishing of journals. It provides a view of the different types of initiatives in terms of their size, operational and business models, technologies used, stakeholder involvement, concentration of scientific fields, growth, as well as regional characteristics and recommendations for SPARC Europe and DOAJ.

 

Go to source: http://sparceurope.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/SE_UPublishing_Report_0315.pdf

Friday, January 29, 2016

The way research is conducted has changed dramatically in the last two decades. New methods and tools (software, hardware, instruments and equipment), new sources of data and the increasing connectivity of global research via the internet mean that researchers across the globe are making progress at an unprecendented pace. But with this paradigm shift comes significant challenges, most notably reproducibility of research and transparency of methods and workflows.

Meeting the challenges of 21st century research requires sound research data management. By carefully planning, documenting and preserving data, the goals of having reproducible and transparent research data are far easier to meet. Further, well-managed data are easier to use and reuse, which translates to more collaboration for researchers and maximum return-on-investment for funders. This primer will cover the basics of research data management, with the goal of helping researchers and those that support them become better data stewards.

Go to source: https://groups.niso.org/apps/group_public/download.php/...

Read more
Friday, January 29, 2016

Many researchers support the idea of increasing access to research, but worry about the implications for their career of sharing their work. This site has been built primarily for researchers, to educate them about all the different ways they can be open and how sharing can be beneficial for their careers. The aim is to provide information and resources for those working in open advocacy.

Go to source: http://whyopenresearch.org/

Friday, January 29, 2016

LERU Statement for the 2016 Dutch EU Presidency

Nowadays, European universities pay publishers significant parts of their university budget. Hundreds of millions of euros. Money which is not directly spent on research and education, even though it is largely taxpayers´ money. As Harvard University already denounced in 2012, many large journal publishers have rendered the situation “fiscally unsustainable and academically restrictive”, with some journals costing as much as $40,000 per year (and publishers drawing profits of 35% or more). If one of the wealthiest universities in the world can no longer afford it, who can? It is easy to picture the struggle of European universities with tighter budgets. In addition to...

Read more
Friday, January 29, 2016

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has published a set of

https://www.niso.org/publications/privacy-principles, set forth a core set of guidelines by which libraries, systems providers and publishers can foster respect for patron privacy throughout their operations. The Principles outline at a high level basic concepts and areas which need to be addressed to support a greater understanding for and respect of privacy-related concerns in systems development, deployment, and user interactions. The twelve principles covered in the document address the following topics: Shared Privacy Responsibilities; Transparency and Facilitating Privacy Awareness; Security; Data Collection and Use; Anonymization; Options and Informed Consent; Sharing Data with Others; Notification of Privacy Policies and Practices; Supporting Anonymous Use; Access to One's Own User Data; Continuous Improvement and Accountability.

Go to source: http://www.niso.org/news/pr/view?...

Read more
Friday, January 15, 2016

37th Annual IATUL Conference,
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
5 – 9 June 2016

The IATUL 2016 Programme Committee invites proposals for papers and posters which should reflect the conference theme: Library Leadership in a Sea of Change

Libraries are developing services for new emerging trends such as data management and curation, scholarly communication/publishing, copyright, open access, text and data mining (TDM) and digital initiatives. Libraries are also reshaping spaces to better respond to the ever changing and growing needs of end user communities. We see more and more collaboration between different units in order to create new and better learning environments where different professionals are joining forces to use their skills and knowledge to support their different communities.

This year’s theme: Library Leadership in a Sea of Change reflects not only our host Institutions’ locale by the ocean, but also provides the opportunity for you to share your cutting edge experiences and knowledge during this time of continuing change in the world of libraries. The programme will...

Read more